Consultations Unpacked: Experiences with the Medical Appeal Board (MAB) Process an exploration of how the Work and Income medical criteria decision review process is working

Council of Social Services Dunedin (COSSD), Dunedin Community Law Centre (DCLC) & Community Law Canterbury Community Forum (CLC) are hosting a  Community Forum on Friday 6 June 2014 12 – 1.30pm at Dunedin Community House.

The subject is Experiences with the Medical Appeal Board (MAB) Process an exploration of how the Work and Income medical criteria decision review process is working.

Everyone is welcome – we want to hear your experiences so that we can look at ways of supporting beneficiaries who are taking medical appeals.

You can find out some information on the current situation by reading our Experiences with the Medical Appeal Board Process Background Paper as a PDF or Web page. Or add to your calendar.

Experiences with the Medical Appeal Board (MAB) Process an exploration of how the Work and Income medical criteria decision review process is working

Consultations Unpacked Background Paper.

Friday 6 June 2014 12-1.30pm
Dunedin Community House

 a Dunedin Council of Social Services, Dunedin Community Law Centre &
Community Law Canterbury Community Forum

 

The MAB is the place to go to appeal a Work and Income decision made on medical criteria (such as eligibility for Supported Living Payment, Jobseeker Support and the Child Disability Allowance). The board is independent of Work and Income. The MAB has the power to change decisions made by Work and Income. It can either agree with the decision, or change the decision. There is no right of appeal against a decision of a Medical Appeal Board. This means it is very important that a case going to the MAB is well prepared, there is strong medical evidence to back up your case and if you need it, you have someone to support or represent you at the hearing.

The MAB is a decision making panel made up of three people. MAB members are appointed by MSD’s Chief Executive and are paid by MSD for their time taking part in hearings. MABs consist of three members* who are:

  • Doctors
  • People with expertise in rehabilitation, such as physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, and psychologists.
  • Other people with the right expertise.

* The board members at your hearing must not have had any involvement in your case or treated you as a patient.

Concern has been expressed locally at the length of time it can take for an appeal to go through, and the composition of the board. While it is recognised that board membership does require people with the right expertise, some clients have indicated that the expertise is limited to specific areas of medicine and their case may fall outside of this area, other clients have expressed concern the board is not gender and culturally diverse.

The forum is interested in hearing local stories and experiences with the Medical Appeals Board so that we can look at ways of supporting beneficiaries who are taking medical appeals.

 Sources and links for further Information

 Work & Income New Zealand

 About medical appeals:

http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/community/health-and-disability-practitioners/about- medical-appeals.html

About the medical appeal board hearings:

http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/individuals/brochures/a-guide-to-medical-appeals-board- hearings.html

Consultations Unpacked: Caring for the Carers an exploration of how the new family carers policy is affecting families caring for disabled relatives

Council of Social Services Dunedin (COSSD) & Dunedin Community Law Centre (DCLC) are hosting a  Community Forum on Friday 2 May 2014 12 – 1.30pm at Dunedin Community House.

The subject is Caring for the Carers: an exploration of how the new family carers policy is affecting families caring for disabled relatives.

Everyone is welcome – we want to hear your experiences and relay them to the Government.

You can find out some information on the current situation by reading our Caring for the Carers Background Paper as a PDF or Web page. Or add to your calendar.

 



Caring for the Carers: an exploration of how the new family carers policy is affecting families caring for disabled relatives

Consultations Unpacked Background Paper

Caring for the Carers

an exploration of how the new family carers policy is affecting families caring for disabled relatives

a Dunedin Council of Social Services (DCOSS) &
Dunedin Community Law Centre (DCLC) Community Forum

Friday 2 May 2014 12 – 1.30pm
Dunedin Community House

In October 2013 the government released a Budget package that would enable some family carers to receive payment for looking after family members. The package was formulated in response to a Court of Appeal decision that a policy of not paying family carers to provide support services to family members living with disabilities constituted discrimination, on the basis of family status. The 2013 Budget provides $23 million a year to pay carers who look after a disabled family members aged 18 years or older who are assessed as having high, or very high needs. Funding enables payment at the minimum wage.

Eligible people can employ a family carer to provide personal care and household management, or continue to use a commercial provider.

The decision was hailed as a step in the right direction, but was not without criticism:

  • Concern has been expressed at the high & very high needs eligibility criteria.
  • There is disappointment that spouses and partners of disabled people are excluded from the scheme.

  • The new legislation (NZ Public Health and Disability Amendment Act 2013) states that people can no longer bring unlawful discrimination complaints about the new law or family care policy to the Human Rights Commission.
  • Some family members leave good paying jobs and take a cut in pay to care for a family member at the minimum wage rate.

Other concerns which have been informally raised include issues around professional development opportunities, support for family carers and the vulnerability of carers in terms of employment rights.

The forum is interested in hearing local stories about how the new family carers policy is affecting families caring for disabled relatives.

What is working? What is not working?

Sources and links for further information

Ministry of Social Development: The New Zealand Carers’ Strategy Action Plan for 2014 to 2018

www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/work-programmes/policy-development/carers-strategy/

New Zealand Herald: Editorial

www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10884930

NZ Public Health and Disability Amendment Act 2013

www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2013/0022/latest/whole.html

Download this page as a PDF.

Add to your calendar.

Consultations Unpacked: The Legal Framework for Burial and Cremation in NZ

Council of Social Services Dunedin & Dunedin Community Law Centre invite you to a community forum to discuss the Law Commission Issues Paper: The Legal Framework for Burial and Cremation in New Zealand and assist with formulating a submission due by 20th December.

This is the first substantial review of New Zealand’s burial and cremation laws, and the terms of reference are deliberately broad. As a result of this forum we will put together a submission which addresses local issues on burial and cremation – and we are very keen to hear your stories and views on burial and cremation in NZ.

The forum is from [new date] 12 – 1:30 Thursday 5 December 2013 at Dunedin Community House, 301 Moray Place, Dunedin 9016

The new date is to allow for the Law Commission meeting on the subject on Thursday 28 November from 1.00pm –3.00pm at Otago Museum, Kakapo Room, 419 Great King Street, North Dunedin.

We’ve prepared a discussion paper you can download as a PDF including a list of questions the Review is looking to address:

Burial and Cremation in NZ

You can easily add the forum to your calendar here: Calendar entry

 

Consultations Unpacked: Engaging Parents in the Education of their Children

You can download these details as a PDF: Engaging Parents Discussion doc

Council of Social Services Dunedin & Dunedin Community Law Centre invite you to discuss the Parliamentary Inquiry into Engaging Parents in the Education of their Children and assist with formulating possible submissions.

12 -1:30 Wednesday 30 October 2013

Add this to your calendar

Dunedin Community House, 301 Moray Place, Dunedin 9106

Bring your Lunch, Tea & Coffee provided

Contact: Rob Tìgeir projects@councilofsocialservices.org.nz 03 471 6177

We’ve prepared a quick guide to the inquiry and some pointers to information to help us get a handle on the topic.

The key points…

The topic for this session is the Parliamentary Inquiry into Engaging Parents in the Education of their Children

The terms of reference for the Inquiry are to investigate the elements of an effective strategy:

  1. for engaging parents, families, whānau, aiga, and communities in education;
  2. to identify the best practice examples of approaches, locally and internationally, that support parents and communities to encourage their children’s learning;
  3. and to identify ways to leverage the strength of communities to lift the educational achievement of children and young people in their community.

As an outcome of this discussion we hope to make a submission. Submissions close 7 November 2013

Some starter Questions…

  • What, if any, barriers exist to engaging parents, parents, families, whānau, aiga, and communities in education?
  • Are you aware of any examples internationally or locally that succeed in supporting parents and communities to encourage children’s learning?
  • how do you think we can harness the strength of communities to lift the educational achievement of children and young people in their community?

Some background reading from around the world…

Aotearoa New Zealand

Ministry of Education information, research and toolkits for engaging parents, whānau, and community:
nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Middle-schooling/Engaging-parents-whanau-and-community

NZ research on engaging parents funded by the Teaching & Learning Research Initiative (TLRI), a body established by the government in 2004 to forge links between educational research and teaching practice:

Active Adult Participation in Early Childhood Education: Enhancing Child Learning and Community Wellness a report prepared by Judith Duncan et al.:
www.tlri.org.nz/sites/default/files/projects/9279_summaryreport.pdf

Australia

Sustaining Community Engagement, Blog – links and information on the Australian context:
sustainingcommunity.wordpress.com/2013/04/05/welcoming-parents-in-schools/

Information on the New South Wales School Learning Support Programme which is supported by The New South Wales Department of Education and Training: www.schools.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/schoolsweb/studentsupport/programs/schoollearning/rf6engage.pdf

Victoria Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Resources for engaging parents in children’s education:
www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/health/pages/drugeduengage.aspx

United Kingdom

Principles for engaging with families: A framework for local authorities and national organisations to evaluate and improve engagement with families, a publication by the UK based  Early Learning Partnership Parental Engagement Group (ELPPEG).
www.ncb.org.uk/media/236258/engaging_with_families.pdf

Research on parents involved in their children’s learning from the UK-based organisation The Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s Services:
www.c4eo.org.uk/themes/families/vlpdetails.aspx?lpeid=414

USA

Engaging Parents in School: Blog – includes links to  articles on engaging parents:   engagingparentsinschool.edublogs.org

In 1995 the United States Department of Education created Parent Information Resource Centres (PIRCs) with the objective to provide parents, schools and organizations working with families with training and information on what they need to achieve at school. The Iowa PIRC has a high profile in this field:
www.iowaparents.org
www.iowaparents.org/files/toolkit/Engaging_Parents_as_Partners_in_Their_Childrens_Education.pdf